Music is that universal language that crosses all boundaries, seeping into the fabric of society and encouraging those who listen hard enough the ability to decipher life’s problems, or at the very least escape them. No longer are records subject to the past, subject to the dust-ridden attics of history. People young and old are breathing new spirit into these relics of times’ past, ushering in a new era of tradition that continues to mesmerize people today. Whether it is aesthetically appealing to the eyes, more artistic, or just plain good to the ears, vinyl continues to harbor a particular position in society; allowing listeners of all ages to learn something about themselves in the process.

If you ask any music aficionado about the difference in sound between vinyl and modern day CD or digital devices, they can definitely confirm that there is a difference. Even if all that you’ve been exposed to is I-pods or MP3s, once you listen to a vinyl record you can definitely tell the difference in sound. Vinyl most certainly has a particular quality about it, producing a sound that is warmer and distinctively its own, enabling its listeners to notice more of the subtle sound and individual instruments.

Moreover, with technology being far more advanced than it was in the past, vinyl pressed today sounds a whole lot better than vinyl pressed in the 60’s or 70’s. No longer are vinyl records being produced from low quality tape masters; the original recordings are now digital, making for an improved sound. Another layer of texture you get from vinyl that listeners also seem to enjoy is the hum of the needle along the records’ grooves and the occasional cracking that comes with the surface noise.
To older listeners, just the nostalgia of listening to vinyl keeps them firmly in favor of keeping this tradition alive. Vinyl also gives some listeners the ability to experience the music a lot more; the experience of buying and then opening up the wrapper, touching the record and maybe smelling the sleeve. You can’t also forget the simple fact that vinyl record sleeves are just plain nice to look at and are an art form within themselves; they’re more aesthetically appealing to the eyes and make the album more collectible.

You’ve got to admit, walking into a room with a shelf full of vinyl records leaves more of an impression compared to just walking into a room with a shelf full of CDs or some type of media player with countless music files. Based on the simple fact that vinyl is more artistic and appealing to the eyes it is far more valuable than just plain CDs, digital files or even tapes.

Being a highly uneven activity, music is different to every listener. There is no simple universal solution to music listening that will sit fine with everyone. Vinyl is just another option to the listening experience, one that has never changed its identity since its creation. Just like the diversity in people, the diversity in music is constantly changing, adapting to what it knows best. Digital music will never die, and the same can be said about vinyl.

Its endurance continues to thrive. If vinyl listening is an experience you want to explore, check out the selection at Sig’s Lagoon, located at 3622 E. Main Street, Houston a great vinyl store along the METRORail at the Ensemble/HCC stop that features new and used LP’s as well as special orders. It’s a good place to listen to both past and modern day artists and meet friends who share a common joy in the art of music.

By Vincent A. Gonzalez

For more information: www.SigLagoon.com
Twitter: @SigsLagoon