Currently based in Houston Texas, Sean Stubblefield graduated Sam Houston State University with a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Television Production and Media Studies.

Sean has written non-fiction (philosophy and media commentary) since 1993, and science fiction since 2008. Author of a dozen books, Sean is also a freelance story consultant/ editor, and an advocate for media literacy with the Artemis Eternal project.

From 2005-2008, as writer and editor, he contributed to The SOP in its beginning, and returned in 2012.

An indie artist who supports indie artists, he created the curating blog From The Stars: http://seanstubblefield.blogspot.com

His awesome photo gallery: http://exastra23.deviantart.com/gallery/

To Contact : exastra@hotmail.com

The news report of Natalie Plummer getting arrested– for providing a public service by warning drivers of a speed trap– illustrates why I don`t trust the police. That woman should be praised for her good deed, not punished. In my experience and observation, it seems to me that the vast majority of police type personnel are out to get you, rather than (and more often than) try to help you.

Our being presumed innocent until proven guilty does not appear to be on their agenda. As a matter of course, they automatically approach and treat us citizens– as if we`ve done something wrong… however trivial or non-existent that “wrong” may be.

I see that motto on their cars “To Serve and Protect”–and I scoff, I smirk, I don`t believe.

Actually, it has been a while since I`ve seen that phrase on a police car.

They could very well do to learn Wil Wheaton`s motto: Don`t be a dick.

Hey, police people: if you are interacting with us in a so-called “Crime” scenario (potential or actual or imagined), and it is clear we are not an imminent danger or immediate threat to you or others nearby, and we are not revealed as a known and wanted suspect/ fugitive— don`t be a dick. Please. There is no call for that nonsense– it does not help the situation or anyone.

If you don`t want us challenging or questioning your authority, then don`t give us a reason to.

Don`t start nothin`, won`t be nothin`.

Indeed, it can only risk making things worse. It damages not only your personal reputation, but also the reputation and credibility of all police.

Don`t be surprised or amazed when we don`t respond well to your crass intimidations and interventions.

Granted, I admit my sampling pool is very small for statistical viability. But, from what I can tell, they generally tend to think–wrongly– that the law gives them a right to abuse their authority by harassing and robbing citizenry with frivolous traffic tickets.

This is a serious pet peeve of mine. These police officers, sheriffs, constables or whatever could be out there dealing with real, legitimate crime. But instead, they spend their time harassing and stealing from public. Gives a new definition to highway robbery.

They are mindless drones and thugs unable or unwilling to think for themselves and discern the difference between word of law and intent of law. They confuse what is legal with what is right, fair and reasonable. Actively or passively, their behavior is tantamount to bullying.

Oh, I`m sure there are some who aren`t on a power trip. The law of averages or probability implies there must be. And I`d like to believe this is true.

But I have never met any of them.

I sincerely propose that judges should hold these police in contempt of court for wasting court time, their time and especially the public`s time and money with frivolous cases.

Law enforcement agents ought to be severely fined, or otherwise punished, by the courts– every time they abuse their power with frivolous tickets… whether these tickets enter the courts or not.

This interference is not only an abuse of power, but an abuse of the public trust. How can I respect you if you abuse your authority? And how can I trust you?

Don`t we have a moral right, as free and sovereign individuals, to reject such unjust and nuisance tickets? Are we not obliged even to resist or evade arrest when they try to detain us, if we have done no wrong? Is it not our duty to challenge or oppose or escape or at least ignore the police– as we would be inclined to do with anyone else who attempts to harass, hinder or harm us?

Why should I have to be disrupted, just because some police person imagines or mistakes I`ve done something wrong? Why must I be required to acquiesce to the apparently carte blanche whims and prejudices of the police?

Why should I– or anyone– have to put up with that?

If the wrong I`ve done is merely alleged or presumed– or if my wrong is a victimless crime, particularly if I have done no one any harm– then I am justified to drive on and disregard.

For way too long, police authority has been overextended; and it is time we put them in their proper place.

Their abuse of power is disturbing– in every sense of that word.

How have they been allowed such gross and egregious leeway?

How about you be the police, and not tormentors or tyrants?